Home Care in Las Vegas NV: How Do Eyes Change with Age?It’s no secret that as people get older, their eyes undergo some changes. It’s not uncommon for people who never needed glasses to suddenly find themselves struggling to read the newspaper or see road signs after the age of 40. Those are changes that can be managed by getting glasses or contacts. However, as people get even older, they are at greater risk for some serious eye diseases that can cause significant vision loss. Knowing what those conditions are can help you to watch for them in your aging relative. Some of the eye diseases that are common in seniors are listed below.

Cataracts

Cataracts occur when the lens of the eye becomes cloudy. They are extremely common in older adults. In fact, by the age of 80, 50 percent of seniors have cataracts. When a senior has cataracts, they may feel like they are trying to see through fog. Or, their vision might be blurry, and colors may not seem as bright. Cataracts are treated with surgery, which typically restores all of the vision lost.

Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is the number one cause of blindness in seniors in the United States. Around 2 million people in the country have this eye condition. People who have macular degeneration slowly lose their central vision. This can make it hard for them to read or drive. There is no cure for macular degeneration, but there are treatments that can slow down the loss of vision, including medications, laser treatments, and more.

Dry Eye

Around 75 percent of people who are older than 40 have dry eye. When a person has dry eye, their eyes don’t make enough tears. It can make eyes feel gritty and cause a stinging sensation. Sometimes eyes might even produce a lot of tears, which is their normal reaction to irritants. Dry eye can be treated using over the counter eye drops. However, if those don’t seem to be enough, an eye doctor can prescribe stronger drops.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma isn’t a single eye condition. Instead, it’s a group of conditions that all affect the optic nerve. When glaucoma first starts, there usually aren’t any symptoms. Your aging relative won’t feel any pain and their vision will stay the same. However, as time goes on, vision can diminish and there’s no way to restore lost vision. Early detection and treatment is the best way to prevent vision loss.

If your older family member has vision loss, home care can help them to do the things that poor vision makes difficult. Home care providers can help them to read their mail and pay bills. Home care can also offer transportation to places like the grocery store, medical appointments, the post office, and more. In addition, home care can assist with tasks around the house, including cleaning, cooking, and doing laundry.

Source
https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2019/eye-changes-with-age.html?intcmp=AE-HP-TTN-R3-POS2-REALPOSS-TODAY

https://nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/aging_eye

https://www.allaboutvision.com/over60/vision-changes.htm

https://www.webmd.com/eye-health/macular-degeneration/age-related-macular-degeneration-treatment#1

https://nei.nih.gov/health/glaucoma/glaucoma_facts

IF YOU OR AN AGING LOVED ONE ARE CONSIDERING HOME CARE IN LAS VEGAS, NV, PLEASE CONTACT THE CARING STAFF AT GOLDEN HEART SENIOR CARE OF SUMMERLIN. 702-800-4616.